The Triumph of Grace: A Review

The Triumph of Grace: A Review

For Block, the Old (or, as he states, First) and New Testaments do not represent two distinct epochs. Rather, "the contrast between ancient Israel's experience and that which the New Testament makes available was not between law and grace, but between mediated grace and embodied grace" (xiv, emphasis original). As someone who has marinated in Moses' words for the past thirty years, Block is convinced that the message of Deuteronomy is not burdensome and oppressive. Rather, for Block, the message of Deuteronomy is Gospel, for God has decided to be God for Israel and give them life.

Kathryn Tanner's Three Principles of a Theological Economy

Kathryn Tanner's Three Principles of a Theological Economy

Tanner contends that Christianity must work towards appropriate theological responses to the economic systems of this world, evaluating them in light of our theological doctrines, and positing constructive alternatives wherever these economic systems fall short of our theological ideals. How do we move forward? By employing these three principles.

Dying as Resurrected People: A Lenten Sermon

Dying as Resurrected People: A Lenten Sermon

 Jesus is not reluctant to speak of glory, but it is located on the other side of his death and resurrection. The way of the cross is the way of glory. The glory of Christ is only possible once we tread the road towards our own death. Like Abram, we must be "as good as dead" to our selves, recognizing that on our  own we are incapable of salvation. On our own, we cannot walk this journey towards death. But the promise of the Gospel is that we do not walk this life on our own, for when we are as good as dead, Christ comes alongside us and walks with us on our journey towards new life. 

The Slow, Meandering God

Down below and off a ways is a river
          which they call Red.

Slowly but surely this river called Red
          has carved out its spot in our land,
          its elbows reaching wide
          watering our fields.

This river brought us here as we came from lands afar
          some, in search of new land and opportunity
          others, fleeing for their lives.

Slowly but surely this river called Red
          carried us here.

O how God is like this river called Red,
          for he too has carried us here,
          slowly but surely,
                    never too quickly,
          the slow, meandering God.

500 Years Later: An Anabaptist Reflection on the Reformation

500 Years Later: An Anabaptist Reflection on the Reformation

I can't help but wonder if we as the church catholic are actually that much better off than we were five hundred years ago. There is but one body of Christ, yet many churches still cannot get along, never mind worship together. Christ's body was broken for us, not for us to emulate, but so that we would be made whole in his presence. As long as the church remains separated from the rest of her body, can we really call the results of the Reformation good?